Ye-Fei Zhu, MD

Laboratory Medical Center, the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China

Dr. Yefei Zhu received his M.D. degree from Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China in 2006. And then he joined to the Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention and focused his efforts on investigating outbreaks of communicable diseases in the following 10 years. He was invited by the Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, China as director and academic leader of Laboratory Medical Center in Dec, 2015. He was also certified as professor and mentor of students studying for doctoral degree in the Second Medical School, Nanjing Medical University, in 2016. 

His research has focused on the diagnosis and epidemiology of infectious diseases, with recent emphasis on molecular and geographic applications in Jiangsu, China. His research also involves extensive collaboration with colleagues from other disciplines, including microbiology, geography, public health, climate change, et al. 

He has published more than 20 articles in the well-known international journals, such as Lancet, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Journal of Medical Virology, Euro Surveillance, Epidemiology and Infection, American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, et al. 

He has published monograph Streptococcosis suis (Editor-in-Chief, Science Press, China) and Priorities in Operational Research to Improve Tuberculosis Care and Control (Editor-in-Chief, Chinese version, authorized by WHO, People Medical Press, China)

He was invited as editors by novel international journals including Jacobs Journal of Microbiology and Pathology, Source Journal of Microbiology, and International Journal of Virology and AIDS.

He was awarded 2014 Jiangsu Province Science and Technology Prize, Second Prize, 2014 Chinese Medical Science and Technology Prize, Second Prize, and 2014 Jiangsu Preventive Medicine Science and Technology Prize, Second Prize.
His research interests are clinical microbiology and infectious diseases.